Pregnant Workers Win Supreme Court Victory

Young Woman Pregnant Sitting On Arm Chairs In Home Living Room W Stock Photo Photo by khunaspix.  Image ID: 100253535
Young Woman Pregnant Sitting On Arm Chairs In Home Living Room
Photo by khunaspix.
Image ID: 100253535

March 26, 2015– WASHINGTON — In a victory for pregnant women in the workplace, the Supreme Court ruled Wednesday in favor of a worker who sued shipping giant UPS for pregnancy discrimination, sending her lawsuit back to a lower court where she had previously lost.

The case, Young v. United Parcel Service, hinged on whether or not UPS was justified in putting Peggy Young on unpaid leave after she became pregnant, even though other workers were commonly offered “light duty” for on-the-job injuries or to satisfy requirements under the American with Disabilities Act. The justices ruled 6-3 in favor of keeping Young’s lawsuit alive, with Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito joining the traditionally liberal members of the court….

(Reposted from The Huffington Post 3/25/2015)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/25/supreme-court-ups-pregancy_n_6940752.html?1427304988

Minimum Wage Freeze Cost American Workers $8.64 Trillion Since 2009

December 4, 2014–  Now that the mid-term elections have come and gone without any action being taken to raise the Federal minimum wage, it is unclear when, or if, any National legislation will be forthcoming. Throughout the current election season populist candidates were touting, seemingly revolutionary increases to the Federal minimum wage, with numbers, as high as, $15 per hour being debated.  Surprisingly, many of these pro-labor candidates were defeated in their election, or re-election, bids for office leaving the probability of immediate action abandoned. The complexion of the incoming Congress has already indicated its early opposition to major changes in this area.

So how does this inaction on the Federal Minimum wage issue impact the American workforce. According to the Center for Economic Policy and Research: “Congressional failure to raise the minimum wage is costing America’s working families and the economy overall. With millions of workers losing billions in pay since 2009 — and hundreds of billions of dollars since the high water mark for the minimum wage in 1968 — it’s no wonder families are falling farther behind and income inequality has exploded even as corporate profits and CEO compensation soar.”

The figure calculated by the CEPR, as of last Monday, is a staggering $6.84 trillion dollar in cumulative losses in wages to the American worker since 2009, as a result of the failure to increase the minimum wage.   Advocates for the increase argue that no legislative gridlock has damaged American workers more, and, possibly, the Amercan Economy.

While opponents of dramatic wage increases sound the alarms of corporate closures, outsourcing, and, general, economic calamity as a result of doubling the minimum wage they have failed to make, even, the slightest movement towards having this figure even, remotely, keep up with the cost of living. Meanwhile, as all indications are that certain segments of the economy are poised for a fiscal rebound from the depths of the Great Recession, the unemployed and underemployed are finding that having a job and working the maximum number of hours they are physically able to withstand is doing little to improve their chances at capturing even a glimpse of the American Dream that their parents told them so much about.

While relative inflation has been low during the period of time from 2009 to the present, one need only compare the isolated statistic of Food Inflation to the Federal minimum wage during this period to see the true impact on the American household. While wages have remained flat, according the US Department of Labor Statistics, Food Inflation has increased at a rate of 4.25% per year from 2009-2014. Combine this with dramatic, recent cuts in the Federal Food Assistance programs and it paints a picture of an underemployed, overworked, and hungry American Family.

If Ghandi was right, and “The True Measure of Any Society can found in how it treats its most vulnerable members” what does the U.S’s national lack of concern over the essential financial solvency of its most vulnerable workers say about it as a society?

 

If you, or someone you know has suffered from minimum wage issues, it is important that they immediately contact an experienced Minimum Wage Attorney.  A qualified attorney can help employees stand up for their rights and recover compensation for their lost wages. 

Neil H. Greenberg, Esq. Featured in the News

October 9, 2014– Neil H. Greenberg, Esq., was featured in a series of News Stories regarding the firm’s representation of certain Defendants in a high profile, Federal, Employment matter being litigated in New York State.  The below intro and link is from the Southampton Press coverage of the ongoing matter:

 

Water Mill Couple To Go To Trial After Judge Refuses To Dismiss Forced Labor Allegations

Publication: The Southampton Press

By Erin McKinley Oct 3, 2014 4:27 PM 

Oct 8, 2014 10:10 AM

A federal judge has refused to dismiss a case against a Water Mill couple in which a former employee claims the pair forced her into indentured servitude between 2005 and 2008.

The suit, which will now be the subject of a trial, was filed by Ni Ketut Sulastri of Bali, who now resides in North Sea, in July 2012. She alleges that she had been hired, through an intermediary in Bali, by Lawrence and Rose Halsey to work for the Halseys’ children’s shoe-making business, Coastal Projection Corporation. She said she was promised a stipend of $450 per month, a 9-to-5 workday, room and board, and help with obtaining lawful permanent resident status…..

http://www.27east.com/news/article.cfm/Water-Mill/82334/Water-Mill-Couple-To-Go-To-Trial-After-Judge-Refuses-To-Dismiss-Forced-Labor-Allegations

Age Discrimination, in the News

Wednesday, October 07, 2009

Since the start of the recession in December 2007, the economy has shed 6.9 million jobs. Downsizing decisions are often made by a single manager. Prejudices will undoubtedly reveal themselves.

The most recent discrimination data from the Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission shows that new claims instituted by employees against employers have escalated by some 15 percent in the last year alone.  Age discrimination charges have seen the largest increase with workers filing thirty percent more discrimination charges against employers than the prior year. 

Continue reading “Age Discrimination, in the News”